Monthly Archives: February 2007

January-February My Most Interesting Pictures As To Flickr

Flickr has an algorithm which decides which picture is most “interesting”. It can be very unusual, but interesting, not picturesque, but interesting. So here is what the Flickr algorithm revealed:

Hama = Norias + Orontes

As to my expectations Hama is a city of modest buildings, not crowded at least in the city center, a space for breathing air and receiving sunshine. It was pleasing the round way about the citadel, with wide pavements, and clean asphalt.

Hama City. Orontes. NoriaHama. Norias On OrontesHama. Norias On OrontesOrontesNorias On Orontes

The look from citadel is especially appealing. You see the bridge of roman-byzantine type from one side, norias, old mosques, a church (at least what I noted), and still newly built Al-Sham hotel, and other historic buildings. Nouri mosque is near too, you can reach by foot after some minutes.

Orontes River is great too, although sluggishly flowing, with still waters found in some locations. Norias on it give special tone, with many bridges built newly, and paved with fine marble.

Panoramic views of Hama from top hill:

An Ancient Bridge. Now On Main Road. HamaView From HilltopHama. Panorama From The HillOld Town Look

Hama Traditions Museum Building:

Hama Traditions MuseumHama Traditions Museum. The Second FloorHama Traditions Museum. The Second FloorHama Traditions Museum. The Second FloorHama Traditions Museum. BackyardHama Traditions Museum. The Second FloorHama Traditions MuseumHama Traditions Museum. FrontyardHama Traditions Museum. FrontyardHama Traditions Museum. FrontyardHama. The National Traditions MuseumHama Traditions Museum. BackyardHama Traditions Museum. BackyardHama Traditions Museum. The Second Floor

Hama Traditions Museum which is also named “Qasr Al-Azm” like the one in Damascus, is a lovely place, the building is more attractive than what is exhibited inside, actually we didn’t spend much time inside the rooms, as the exhibits are universal among Damascus, Aleppo and other “traditions” museums in Syria.

The building is said to be from middle centuries, and is similar to the many Arabic style buildings in Aleppo, or Damascus. The courtyard in the middle inside with a greenish water pool, with small statues, is beautiful. The museum naturally placed in the old streets of Hama, also similar to Aleppo ones, with some difference in the color of stones, here is whiter.

The square which is called “Assi” was never jammed or crowded contrary to my surprise. This is just near to a park built actually on Orontes’s basin. You can walk here and watch the norias. I missed the moment of taking pictures of norias while they are working.

And finally the highway from Aleppo side comes itself towards the city center. We didn’t have much difficulty in finding our way.

Nature scenes from Hama district:

Hama-Aleppo Highway SideHama NatureHama. NatureHama. Nature.Hama. Nature

Hama, inside city:

Hama City CenterA Byzantine Souvenir In Hama City Center On StreetOrontes. The Historic RiverNorias On OrontesHama StreetsNorias On OrontesNorias On OrontesChildren In Hama Playing OutdoorsNouri Mosque MinaretA Hand-made WaterfallHama. Old TownHama Old TownHama Old TownOld TownAt Nouri MosqueOld TownHama Old StreetsStreet Near Norias And Old Bridge

We met an atelier, who was owned by Painter Samir Tanbar, he made paintings by coffee for the first ever trial in Syria. His atelier is just near Hama Traditions Museum. Here is how looked a collage of his paintings:

A Hamawi Painter's AtelierA Hamawi Painter's Atelier

The park at the tophill, where lies remnants of ancient citadel:

Hama. Remnants Of Past On TophillRemnants Of Roman Ruins On The Hill Of HamaHilltop Park In HamaHama City Park

Mshabbak

At 20km distance from Aleppo, the Mshabbak church, one of Dead Cities 700 locations in north-west Syria, stands since 17 centuries.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dead_Cities

The nature around the church.

Kharab Al-Shams. One Of Dead Cities.

Dead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-Shams Church

Dead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-Shams

Dead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-Shams ChurchDead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-Shams ChurchDead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-ShamsDead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-Shams ChurchDead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-ShamsDead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-ShamsKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities Area

Dead Cities Heritage - Kharab Al-Shams

Kharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams - Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams - Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams - Dead Cities Heritage

Kharab Al-Shams - Dead Cities Heritage

Kharab Al-Shams Church - Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities HeritageKharab Al-Shams. Dead CitiesKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities AreaKharab Al-Shams. Dead CitiesKharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities Area

The remnants at Burj Haidar location:

Kharab Al-Shams. Dead Cities

Comments

Katpix (a Canadian citizen):
I can’t believe the richness of history of your country. Well, I can believe it. I am just admiring all these fantastic pictures. These ruins, these palaces and temples were once flourishing cities. You photograph them so lovingly, and present them here to us to enjoy and to think about.
Even if I don’t comment, I look through your pictures often, and I always find something wonderful! Thank you!

Jaradeh. One Of Dead Cities

Jaradeh Ruins

Jaradeh Ruins

The Dead Cities are a group of 700 abandoned settlements in northwest Syria between Aleppo and Hama. They date back to before the fifth century B.C and contain many remains of Christian Byzantine architecture. Important dead cities include Qal’at Sim’an, Serjilla and al Bara. Chris Wickham, in the authoritative survey of the post-Roman world, Framing the Early Middle Ages(2006) argues that these were settlements of prosperous peasants which have few or no specifically urban features. The impressive remains of domestic architecture are the result of the prosperity of peasants who benefited from a strong international trade in olive oil at the end of Antiquity.
WIKIPEDIA INFO

Jaradeh. Stones A Lot To TellJaradeh. Fine ArchesJaradeh RuinsJaradeh RuinsJaradeh. Fine ArchesJaradeh RuinsJaradeh RuinsJaradeh. General View JaradehJaradeh. PastSculpture On Walls. Jaradeh, SyriaNature At JaradehJaradeh. Arches

Jaradeh. What Left!

Jaradeh Ruins

Qasr Al-Banat (Girls’ Palace)

Girls' Palace قصر البناتIt was a gloomy day, clouds gathered, ready to pour down, but I preferred to have an outing away of week’s headaches.
Qasr Al-Banat belongs to Dead Cities collection. It is found near Maarat Al-Nuuman small town on highway between Aleppo and Damascus. It is apparently was something a church or other religious building.

Dead Cities NatureDead Cities Nature - Al-DanaGirls' Palace قصر البناتCloudsGirls' Palace قصر البناتGirls' Palace قصر البناتGirls' Palace قصر البناتGirls' Palace قصر البنات